(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "X Collection 197B"



X Collection 
INDEX 



Page: 



Barcode Number 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

Si iliilliiiiiiii'i! ' "ii.'i.ti.ii.i.iiiii 



Hill 
020 534 768 9 



f 

L 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

I 'ill! lim I 1 !! i!!l !! "' "'" "'" " " !B" M ■• 



020 534 770 7 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

ill iim Mm urn iiiii i it mil n nm 1 1 n . 



020 534 771 9 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

!!!!!! •'!!!! !!"! '!!" J" 11 "" , " IM "" l l" 11 >l1 " l[,|[ >■" ' 




020 534 772 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 
lull ■■!! !!!!!!! !!!!!!"!!" —— imi 




020 534 773 2 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



llll IIIII IIIII IIIII llll 



iiiii iiiii iiiii iiiii iiiii inn mi mi 




L 



020 534 774 4 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

milium iiiii. <Im Mid Mil iiii iiii. iim iii n 



020 534 775 6 



Box Number 



m 



\% 



\% 



IVA 



m 



im 



m 



Total of 
Volumes 




Call Number 



1 









H°l 



IVB 27 



W 255 'W 253, Z7 



W253M(M-*\ 



-rv 




0Q253.Nl(W3-l<l-rti 






Hi) 






3 



37 WffiNi(i<m-i<m) 



Vt/25W(/lit-l<lH9\ 



c 



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:. 



2- 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

mi urn iiiii inn inn urn urn urn mi mi 




020 534 776 8 



L 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



i milium iiiii i 



mi inn inn iiiii mil mm in mi 




020 534 777 A 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 
!!!! !!!!! Ml!!! 11 ! 1 !'■" "•" IN " l,NI ll1 * 1 "" i'" 



020 534 778 1 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

iii iiiii Hi Hi ! II" '"" '"" ''" ■ " "■" ' " "i' " 




020 534 779 3 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



illinium iiiii inn i 



iin.iiii.ii in 



■hi iiiii nun in n 



020 534 780 R 



Box Number 



00 




201A 



2DZB 



203 



m 



Total of 
Volumes 



10 



3% 



12- 



m 



Call Number 



rNir \-^Q 






H38. 



iWr 



vd2S3M(\m-mi) 

fryer . \ ~2f& 



mimlmi-mC) 



^jer'bR-LpO 



31 



wrnm (mi-mi) 



W253.Z- 

vom.Hiz.A5 



L 






' 



: 



•■•■ 



■Ji*^fc ^*^v 



X-x>3) as: 3 




i 



%j 






• 



C O ," j :■ 









w< 



/ ( sepi*«B 






£ 



3 



' 



e 



«■ 




]The indexed copy of this 
is filed in 100-72924-209 



n 



[*he original German language 
La filed in 100-72924-125 




4 

■ 



- ■ 






•- 






' 



' 






/ 









m± 



■# 



,-Page 1- 




OlIR STRUGGLE AGAINST HITLER. 

Minutes of the First Nation-wide Congress of the 
Movement " Free Germany" in Mexico. 

Jgy 8. and 9 9 1945,^ 

Hotel Regis, Mexico, D.F. 

Supplement: 
The Latin-American Committee of the Free Germans 



MOVEMENT » FREE GERMANY", MEXICO. 








L 




'j/.*-? SJ5& 3^H2^ 



fHIT 






Paul Merker 

Former Member, German Reichstag 



% 



WORKERS LIBRARY PUBLISHERS • NEW YORK 



10* 



C 



c 



" 



a 



c 



^ 



« 


• 


.',-!; ■ / ' - "T"?""j 




X~Sft*5* 




;^f 




©eburtenfurieg 


-. 


' n>et reben to Hi, dec ftdmpfe a(fo, 
und tocr nf d)t ftdmpfen mill tn 
dfefet melt dea enrigen Ringena, 
oerdient das Ceben nid)t. 

Jlbolf fitter 

* 


' 


Cefjrftoff des 5auptfcf)ulungsamte9 




9lur ffir ben SJienftgebrauifcl / 2TC>brud ober 2£bgabe an Unbered)tta.te 

nicbr geffattet. 


* > 




- ' fe . ' s .. .: 

4. 






L 



C 



9 



,H 




V 



X-DD253 

M2 #ro 



5>atm 
9ltmm mi ft lied! 



m 




Kommiffion^erlag: $ei). fjeber, flugsbutg 






, V 




V. 


X-DD2§a 




- 


.N2 irm 

OKH • Generalinspekteur fur den Fiihrernachwuchs 






des Heeres / Abt. A. U. 






Nationalsozialistische 




Fiihrung 


- 




Heit 10 

* 




c 


Die politischen Grundsatze 


'" 


der Reichserneuerung 


- 






! 




Verlag Moritz Diesterweg • Frankfurt am Main 




J 


< 


4. 




:• 



c 




^KpSSS 




m *5s 1 


■ 


■ 


ihihj^bh 


- 






■ 

I 




93ot1iegenbe Heine Q5rof4>tke 

fott in hir&en Umriffen ba$ Tlufgabengebiet ber 

<Propaganba*2(bteifang unb ber <Propaganba ertautern unb etntge 

»td)tige Ottctytlinien fur bie ^ropaganbo felbft geben. 



£ciffa^c fii 

35er <Propafi 
Htt> 

A. Otebe, 

I. £>er Dlebi 

1. 

2. 



II. 



• ' 




3tn Suffrage ber Dletd)«-<ParteiUttun8 bet 
2R. @. £>. X <P- 



Jperausgegeben son ber <P r o p a 9 an b a - 2( b t e i I u n 9 



i 



III. ©te @i 

1 
2 




c 






L 




X-DD253 

rn 



SCHRIFTENREIHE 



der Nationalsozialistischen 
Betriebszellen-Organisation 



REINHOLD MUCHOWt 




c 



c 







Nr. 10 



X-DD253 J I 

M 



Schulungs- 

TJnterlage 



Deutschland ordnet Europa neu ! 



Herausgeber: Der Reichsorganisationsleiter der NSDAP. 

Hauptschulungsamt, Amt Lehrwesen 



^ 



c 



* '• 



L 






latfct gclmigt, 
ntti ocrg«[(«n 
1) trtujietcn." 
<$« OT'miftei) 

nirfit uor- 

mit nictit- 

;um letiten 

iialiftifdien 



Gefchidite 
feine ent)- 
:s fuhrers 
cnber Be- 
rt heutigen 
i Dergpnnt 
3U t)elfen. 

Tell ties 
igenfyeit, 

t. ■- 



ml 













c 



Johann von Leers 



# 



y\ 



X-DD253 
JM2 




(Stbankm, 
wnbtetwigeReidi 



c 







3 o h a n n t> o n leers 

Utile r 
61aube 

Deutfchlanfc! 

CeOanhen 
um Oae erolgc Reich 

s. ftuflagt. 101.— 375. TautcnO 

VERLA6 SI6RUNE, ERFURT 






X-DD253 
•N2#i 



L 



Hie JUaij^eif 



ubcr den 



nniionolcn 4To3iaii$mu$! 



v 



JUa^r arte tootlcn! 
H031 fm poft* u. IWcgeapl'icn&efrie&c. 



C 



. 



" 



Serausgeber, 33erleger: 9lrbeitsgemeinftf)aft national* 
fojialiftifd) gefinntet beutfcfyer ^5oft«, Selegrapfjena unb 

getnfpredjangeftellter. . 
gflr ben 3nf)alt oerantroortHcb, : loans laglicber, btibe 

Sffiien, 6., girfdiengajfe 25 
Stucfe: Sofef ©erttmmjer, SBien, 2., 3ir6usga[fe 24 






L 



■. 



stellV. 



X-DD253 

M2 ; 



W 



GENERALKOMMAND O VII. AlK.3 |1* 

if- - -?, 

**• 21. JUK 



Wehrkreis-Fibel 




i» i 



AnJ. 



L 




WEHRKREISDRUCKEREI VII MUNCHEN 



C 



L 



S 




L 



C 



X-DD253 



JO 



fWteuttoet ttetbonfr 



6run«>3ugc 

dee oolHf^cn 




Dtutf: ncudcutr*e»Mlo8»'U.a:tcul)Otid=«efcUf*oftm.b.ev ««'«« «» 11 

fi edema nnPra fie 12 




I 









c 




X-DD253 



L 



£>riettttmtng$matfct)e 
Siienjlplan einet@2l© 



(m$m <m* *> er 3 - 3t«f[age be* .. £ e 1 1 f a b e tr ) 



c 



SBearbeitet unb jufammengeftettt 
oott < 

2lbam, 

efttfm*amtffi$m unb £ Qxtfifytt bet 








c 




Prels 10 Pfg. 



2. Auflage 51.— 80. Tausend 



Heft 4 



L 



C 




ton ©0«j«n fed! 

*}3arteibudjbeantte unb beren ©efyalter! 
3ttfe(lW ♦ Urfadjett imferes Slenbs ! 

HiefED-6e0fl!fer M Dei Boon, M net flttoiftei ufm. 

(Joburg, ein 33eifptel not.=fo^. Spartuirtfdjaft unb £ud)tfgfoett! 





L 




By MOSES MILLER 



C 




■:' 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Moses Miller, the author of this pamphlet, is the editor of 
Jewish Life. He is widely known as a teacher, writer, and 
authority on the history, struggles, and problems of the Jew- 
ish people. 

During the war he served in the U.S. armed forces stationed 
in India. He is also author of numerous pamphlets, including 
Crisis in Palestine and Soviet "Anti-Semitism"— The Big Lie. 



NAZIS 



THE RENAZIFIC 






Published by New Century Publishers, 832 Broadway, New York 3, N. Y. 

JUNE, 1950 ^^fe>2°9 PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 



I 



I. SEW! 

On November 16 
(Level of Industry 
level of German steel 
it had been set up 
and the Soviet Unii 
insure that German) 
a new kind of Gem 

L.O.I.C. v -ppc 
and how m is t< 

of industry aTSrTiow 
that had suffered at 1 

L.O.I.C. had a big 
a little progress ton 
when L.O.I.C. memt 

Sorry, said the Am 
Clay has just issued a 
discuss steel or chemi 

But General Clay 
the others argued. 

Sorry, said the Ami 

Who gummed up 

The answer was g 
Ratchford in a book 
time after. 

"The moving 
Rufus J. Wysor, ; 








H? 



j j • MfiyZu 




*\»*^A~»\/i 







Die 






4$ - $Ly*£ % 



L 



politische Konzepiion 

J r» X-DD253 

des neiches 2 



- 



In die Mitte der Welt :*"** 

auf den hartesten Stand, 

hat Gott dich gestellt, 

mein Vaterland. ! ' 

Und du hast nur die Wahl: 

bist du zerrissen und schwach 

spielen die Nachbarn Schach 

auf deinem Feld. 

Hammerst du hart dich zu Stahl 

bist du die Achse der Welt. 

Will Vespar. 



Erarbeitung und Harausgaba: Der Reichsffihrer-ft, ^-Hauptamt. 



C 



I 



L 



§ 



c 






O 



rganize 



toP 



reserve 



Democrac 

» awe? tfo 

DEFEAT FASCISM 

Z73/ 
JOHN L. LEWIS 




The following is the text of the address delivered Monday, 
March 15, by John L. Lewis before the anti-Nazi mass meeting 
at Madison Square Garden: 

We have assembled tonight to consider a situation which 
is of the greatest concern to every worker and every proponent of 
human freedom in America. I refer to the situation of the 
workers in Fascist Germany. It concerns us hot only because, as 
men and women, we must feel the tribulations of our fellows but 
because we must ourselves take thought for the future. We have 
before us an object-lesson and a warning. 

You all know the broad outlines of the German situation. In 
1933, soon after Hitler had seized power, the organized labor 
movement of this country joined with the organized labor move- 
ments in other lands, and declared a boycott against German- 
made goods. At that time, we stated that the boycott would be 
continued until such time as the German Government recognized 
the right of the workers of Germany to organize in bona-fide 
unions and until Germany ceased to persecute the Jewish people 
merely because of their race and religious belief. 

The deadly terror practiced by the Nazi Government since 
1933 against the workers of Germany and all minority groups 
has proven how right we were, and the necessity of strengthen- 



C 




PAMPHLETS 

* Published by the 

Education Department, 

International Union, United 

Automobile Workers of America 



Labor Problems, Sketch of American Labor Movement, 

By Joel Seidman — 10c 

Collective Bargaining, By Merlin D. Bishop..... 15c 

Introduction to Labor Problems, By Joel Seidman — 15c 

A B C of Parliamentary Law, By August Claessens and 

Rebecca E. Jarvisl 15° 

A Manual for Trade Union Speakers, By August Claessens.... 15c 

Workman's Compensation and Occupational Disease 15c 

Sit-Dow ns, By Joel Seidman l° c 

Duties of the Shop Steward, By Merlin D. Bishop 05c 



J 



CA 



8146 



Order from 

MERLIN D. BISHOP, Educational Director 
805 Hofmann Building 



Detroit, Mich. 




Union Printing Co. of Detroit 



274 East Vern'or Highway 



c 



=: 



L 




■ 4< & THE 



^ 



i 




NATI© 
COMMITTEE 






"FREE 




I 

■ 



■»jir. 

TASKS 
MEN 



BY SIEGBEBTKAIIN 



I. N- G. PUBLICATION 3^ 



L 



L 



6> I ■ 15 






' 






The New 



Und 




Its Political. Social, Economic and Nationalistic Aspects 

as Reflected by the Testimony of Foreign Observers, 

Writers and Statesmen. 



C 



Edited by 



Frederick Franklin Schroder 

Author of "The Germans in the Making of America", 
"German-American Handbook", "1683-1920", Etc. 



¥. 



Published by 



Deutscher Weckruf 
und Beobachter 



P. O. Box 24— Station K. 



New York, N. Y. 



L 



PRICE, 15 CENTS 



c 



n 



^Background of War: III 

"We Thank Our Fuhrer" 




/ So choruses the German nation. But for what? For blood purges? No. For made 
work? Yes. For fatless meals? No. For the sensation of being masters again in their own 
house? Yes. How Germany looks to the Germans and why so many of them like it. 



L 



VISITORS who loiter along Berlin's Unter den Linden (where 
lampposts have replaced the famous old lindens) or past the 
terraces and cafes of the Kurfiirstendamm are struck by the fact 
that while German dress is cheap and sleazy the German faces 
are solid, healthy, cheerful. These same visitors bring back reports 
that the Third Reich is firmly behind Hitler; that people who 
were apathetic or harassed in 1932 are now busy and bustling at 
their work and in their violently athletic play; that stories of food 
shortages are ridiculous; that German youth has found a program, 
a religion, and a god that are not to be tampered with lightly; and 
that the population is convinced that Hitler will get what Germans 
want without plunging them into war. 

The cheerful faces and the bustling and the new profusion of 
tennis courts and the worship of the Fuhrer are facts that Germans 
who value their own safety do not normally stop to qualify; hence 
the casual observer, if he lacks fundamental interest in a political 
quarrel at least as old as Athens and Sparta, is likely to come away 
with the immediate impression that fascism has been much ma- 
ligned. But the newspaper correspondents have a different story 
to tell. They have lived long enough in Berlin to take the cheerful 
faces for granted; to them Berlin is a tough place, and dull, and 
since every now and then one of their news tipsters gets jailed or 
shot, the repressive features of the regime are brought 
home to them in a peculiarly grisly way. 

The Berlin correspondence of French, English, and 
U.S. papers, then, can be taken as disenchanted as 
opposed to enchanted truth. Read this correspondence 
and you will learn that Germany is suffering from a 



shortage of eggs and butterfats; that audiences at the Deutsches 
Theatre have broken into cryptic but significant applause at a line 
in Schiller's Don Carlos calling for freedom of thought; and that 
the recent statement of the Reichsbank indicates by its artful omis- 
sions that Germany is staving off inflation and collapse only by 
the most adroit economic maneuvering the world has ever seen. 

THE correspondents, of course, do not have to be taken as gospel. 
Under a dictatorship all the standard economic rules are off; 
fats can be produced overnight by legerdemain involving a three- 
cornered swap that sends German armament, say, to Smyrna, figs 
to Copenhagen, and Danish butter to Lubeck or Stettin. As for 
the collapse indicated by the statement of the Reichsbank, it must 
be remembered that journalists have predicted inflation and col- 
lapse in Italy annually for fifteen years. Hence the enchanted 
truth of the contented German faces and the disenchanted truth 
of the correspondents must not be dismissed as a startling but in- 
explicable paradox. The two truths, like a Hegelian thesis and 
antithesis, must be resolved into some higher synthesis— a synthesis 
that will account for the strange fact that a sausage-loving nation 
can be reasonably placid while eating sausage made by stuffing fish 
into ersatz, or substitute, casings; and that a nation that worships 



THE AUDIENCE ITSELF IS THE DRAMA 

. . . in Hitler's Third Reich. Beloiv see the black-helmeled troops 
of the Schutz-Staffel. or special guard, as they listen to the in- 
toxicating eloquence of the Fuhrer at the annual Reichspartei- 
tag. or Nazi party congress, in Nurnberg. 




c 



L 



FASHION PLATE 1937 

Socially correct, the last word and 

up-to-the-minute 

BILLY BAXTER 
QUININE SODA 

Billy Baxter has created the first 
beverage ever made in America 
that is scientifically cooling in 
hot weather. It is the finest of all 
drinks for after golf, or sometimes 
before golf. It is expected to be- 
come the most popular hot weather 
drink in the Western hemisphere. 

j Billy Baxter Quinine Soda with 

the addition of a jigger of gin 

results in the world famous and 

celebrated drink 

GIN and TONIC 

Order Billy Baxter Quinine Soda, 
arrange for your country club to 
keep it for you, be progressive, be 
convinced, be one of the first to 
know, to understand, 
to appreciate. 
Recipe for Gin and Tonic on request 
I RED RAVEN CORP., Cheswick, Pe 



WELLS BEDDING- 



Not everyone 
can have it 

. . . but YOU can! 

Although we wtsh it might be possible, 
of course it is obvious that not every- 
one can have Bedding by Wells. There 
are three reasons: being hand made, 
the quantity is naturally limited; being 
custom built and truly superlative, it is 
not sold by department stores hut by In - 
terior Decorators ; and being necessarily 
priced above the "commercial" types, 
it is out of reach of "the millions". 

But $34.50 is not really high priced. 
That's where we start . . . and we stop 
somewhere around $160. We make 
real bedding at every price. 

It might be a good idea to see your Decorator, 
soon, about [his! He is an expert on [he subject 
of fine mattrestet and springs, built to order to 
your own specifications of comfort! Or write u», 
if you prefer. Three convenient addrcssei.) 



Germany 

[Continued from page 235] 



Chicago Kactoiyi 440 W. Hur 



WELLS A 

& CO., INC^; 



HSound Copies of FORTUNE 

Back copies of Fortune, prior to the January, 1936 issue, will be 
bound at the prices quoted below if subscribers will return their 
copies, postage prepaid, to Fortune's New York office. Orders 
should be accompanied by a check covering the cost of binding. 
Return shipment will be made express collect from New York. 

The prices: Three isjues per book 

Crash $4.00 

Three-quarters black calf $6.50 



Fortune 



BINDING DEPT„ 40) LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



CHlIP. -MJODIELC 



A MODEL OF YOUR SHIP 
All The Liners 




L 



Modelt ci.7 Iron B< '• lo I 1 >fich« in length, bu.lt lo .nd „dua1 

Catalogue »iik photogjaphk iltgilroiioni ond prica lilt, » 

ORDER DIRECT FROM SHOP 







COD. by NAMES OF SHIPS - - - - S3.50mi5.J5 

Van Ryper - Vineyard Haven - Mass. 



of his fife away in his Bavarian 
chalet. As a matter of fact he has 
never clone much actual State 
work other than sign State papers. 
But if lie should die, hell might 
break loose in Germany. For die 
rest of the Nazi leadership is 
united only in its devotion to or 
fear of the Fiihrer. 

Hitler himself is a "common 
man," a soldier who got his belly- 
ful of lighting during the last war. 
Goring, too, had his fill of actual 
combat; he was severely wounded 
and is held together by a steel 
brace. Neither von Blomberg, the 
War Minister, nor von Fritsch, 
who is the silent power in the 
Wchrmacht, thinks that Germany 
is ready in terms of officers, men, 
guns, and ammunition to risk a 
fight— just yet, at any rate. But 
there arc more radical elements in 
the Nazi party: Gocbbels, for ex- 
ample. And there is Rosenberg, the 
Bait, who for ideological reasons 
connected with his fantastic my- 
thosof Teuton supremacy wants to 
carry through the Drang nach Of- 
ten. If this push to the east sticks 
merely to economic penetration of 
the Danube valley along the old 
Berlin-to- Baghdad route. Germany 
will not necessarily collide with 
Russia. She is more apt, in the 
end, to collide with England's in- 
terests in the Middle East. So the 
question mark is— England. Is the 
British Empire willing to tolerate 
a mighty Germany in central and 
eastern Europe? If so, then Eng- 
land has changed more than most 
people think. 

If there is no war, then what of 
the future of a nation that is being 
economically prepared for war? 
Industry, in Germany, needs the 
shot in the arm of war orders. 
Failing these, the economy must 
move toward a completer meas- 
ure of Socialism— or at least to- 
ward the creation of consumers' 
goods to appease the masses— if it 
is to keep its boom going. But 
this would bring the conservative 
Nazis, the ones who think the 
proletariat should wait to get 
their pie in the sky when they die, 
i nto conflict with such as Dr. 
Gocbbels, the radical whose real 
method is to fight international 
Bolshevism with national Bolshev- 
ism—which ends up as the same 
thing. The Nazis have recently dis- 
closed that they propose to abol- 
ish "abstract rights of property" 
and traditional notions of inher- 
itance. But it Germany moves to- 
ward a completer collectivization, 
what of the small farmer? Darre, 
Minister of Agriculture, is sworn 
to protect him against agitation 
for collective farming. 



Looked at closely, the totali- 
tarian State is seen to be a tem- 
porary amalgam of conflicting 
elements. The struggle for internal 
power goes on— muted, disguised, 
but still harshly significant. And 
the underground opposition? It is 
weak. The Communists and the 
Social Democrats have cells in the 
working-class organizations but 
these cells can only bide their time. 
Otio Strasser, Gregor's brother, 
keeps his Sckwarze Front opposi- 
tion within the Nazi ranks alive 
in a feeble sort of way and carries 
on polemics from Prague. The ex- 
Democrats talk in private. The 
church, both Protestant and Cath- 
olic, bickers with Hitler con- 
stantly, but all it can do is main- 
tain a stalemate that prevents 
Wotan and the old gods from oust- 
ing Jehovah. It cannot lead a new 
revolution for it lacks the eco- 
nomic basis for revolutionary or- 
ganization. People in Germany 
still go to church on Sunday but 
they make their livings in a Na- 
tional Socialist economy. The 
economy can hardly be challenged 
from within, for it can shift Left- 
ward to meet any challenge. It 
can be effectively threatened only 
from without. 

That threat would materialize 
very quickly with war. As we have 
seen, neither Hitler nor Goring 
is anxious for fighting for the 
fighting's sake. But die Nazis have 
certain psychological necessities 
that drive them into a gambling 
foreign policy. They have sold 
themselves to the masses as the 
regenerators of theGerman people. 
This "regeneration" demands its 
symbolic victories— such as the re- 
militarization of the Rhineland. 
It will almost certainly demand a 
continuation of its victories. And 
this must lead the Nazis toward 
gambling on, say, the Anschluss 
with Austria, or the repatriation 
of the German portion of Czecho- 
slovakia. In order to make their 
bluffs effective the Nazis are re- 
arming. Will a point be reached 
where the Frankenstein monster 
of army and armaments begins ef- 
fectively to dominate national 
policy? Will the Nazis make a mis- 
take and pick a moment to bluff 
when England or Russia is not in 
the mood to back down? They 
run that chance. It was the Ger- 
man von Clauscwitz who said: 
"War is the continuation of pol- 
itics by other means." When an 
"accident" interrupts the interna- 
tional politics of negotiation or 
intrigue, the "other means" arc the 
only alternative to the ignominy 
of backing down. And dictators 
don't dare to back down. 



234 



c 



$ 



L 



COM IT £ FEME NINO #7 l~\ 

N AC I ON A L DE AYUDA 
u _ A LAS DEMOCRACIAS 2 

kMDxss 

Mi 




L 





J 



Desesperaci6n 



Imp. ''ASIES".-Ura 363.-Tei. 69781 








! 






c 


-— -- - 




X-DD253 


■ 


- 






.N2 










• *f i . 






\ 


,■ ■ 


— 


^ 


c 


■ ■ 


\ - - 




\ 




SXt 


• 


• 


- 




\Z$ 


1 


- 




c 


- 

















L 






©efmung 





23on 




3S. 








c 






Millionen zur Verfugung stellen, dann wissen sie ganz 
genau, warum sie das tun, dann wissen sie, da8 sie 
diese Riesenbetrage wieder hereinbringen 
werden. 

Die Niederwerfung der deutschen Ar- 
beit e r k 1 a s s e, die vollige Entrechtung des 
deutschen Proletariats, die der Hakenkreuz- 
faschismus in einem blutigen Burgerkrieg vollziehen soil, 
das ist das gute Qeschaft, auf das die Kapitalisten- 
klasse spekuliert! 

Aus den H linden deutscher Unternehmer 
empfangt Hakenkreuz- Judas die Silberlinge, um die 
deutsche Arbeiterschaft an i h r e erbittert- 
sten Feinde zu verraten. 

Aus den Handen auslandischer Unternehmer 
empfangt Hakenkreuz- Judas die Silberlinge, um die 
Internationale Front der f as c his tisc hen 
Reaktion zu starken. 

Aus den Handen des franzosischen Riistungs- 
k a p i t a 1 s empfangt Hakenkreuz- Judas die Silberlinge, 
um die ganze europaische Menschheit an 
jenefurchtbarenHyanenzuverraten, die aus 
einem Meer von Blut unermeBliche Reichtiimer miinzen 
wollen. 

Das sind die Hakenkreuzler, die 
Judasse des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts, 

in i t d er e n II i If e d i e Me n s c h h e i t a n s K r e u z 
geschlagen werden soil! 

Wann endlich werden die Manner und Frauen, die der 
roten Fahne mit dem schwarzen Hakenkreuz noch immer 
f olgen, diesen unerhorten Verrat erkennen 
und die Hitlers zum Teufel jagen? 



Wann endlich wird Deutschland 

aus diesem Fiebertraum erwachen? 



Verlag der Wiener Volksbuchhandlung, Wien VI, QumpendorferstraBe 18. — Fiir 

den Inhalt verantwortlich: Hans Philipp, Beamter. — Druck: „VorwSrts". — Beide 

in Wien V. Rechte Wienzeile 97. 




L 



L 



C 



X-DD253 
.N2 



# 







3nformaflotwmaterfa( for :Kdd?0propagan<>afetfan$ 

for tfC£)3(p. uni> de$ Propagandaamfes tor 

£)eu<fd?en Slrfcettefronf 



iiSJf 





3eti<ra(t>er(ag Sg£ frer !He<D3(p. 



L 



C 



WA 5 



uttd Dolt 




Bom Prcu0lf^en etoaterat tDil^elm 66t0Cr nt.d.K. 

ffrtufcfinder tar Albeit, Ztycinlond / tandraebmann • tDefl to tl.e.e.©. 



L 



L 



: - 



L 



C 






Visit 

(jCRMANY 









ft 


I 


• 






Published and Distributed by 




the 




Non-Sectarian Anti-Nazi League 




to Champion Human Rights, Inc. 




SAMUEL UNTERMYER, President 




20 West 47th Street 




New York 

• 




1 

NOTE: Please pass this pamphlet on to your friends 
who may be planning a European trip this 
year. If further copies are desired they may 
be procured free of charge by applying to the 
above address. 




^MBl 234 




illustrations by Mitchell loeb Printed in U.S.A. 

< 








J